Mealworm

Scientific Name:
Tenebrio molitor

Geographical Range:
Europe, Asia.

Diet:
Dried plant material and grains. In captivity they can be reared on flour, dried bread, cereal or wheat germ with the occasional slice of apple or potato for moisture.

Size:
Larvae sizes vary between 4-5cm.

Interesting Fact:
Mealworms are really beetle larvae, so they metatmorphose into a Darkling beetle.

Cricket

Scientific Name:
Acheta domesticus

Geographical Range:
Worldwide.

Diet:
Crickets are omnivores eating almost any plant or animal matter.

Size:
Up to 2 cm long as adults.

Interesting Fact:
Only the male crickets can produce the chirping sound by rubbing their back wings together.

Cecropia Moth

Scientific Name:
Hyalophora cecropia (Larva of the moth)

Geographical Range:
East of Rocky mountains in the United States and Canada.

Diet:
Maple trees, Wildberry, plum, elderberry, willow, birch, lilac, etc.

Size:
Larvae can grow to about 10 cm.

Interesting Fact:
This larva turns into one of the largest Moths with a wingspan of about 13 cm or more.

Monarch Caterpillar

Scientific Name:
Danaus plexippus (Larva of the butterfly)

Geographical Range:
Canada, America, New Zealand, Australia, Europe etc.

Diet:
Milkweed plants.

Size:
Larvae can grow to about 5-6 cm.

Interesting Fact:
This larva turns into the infamous Monarch butterfly, recognizable by the orange and black pattern on their wings.

Silkworm

Scientific Name:
Bombyx mori (Larvae of the moth)

Geographical Range:
China and Iran

Diet:
Mulberry Leaves

Size:
They can reach up to 20 cm.

Interesting Fact:
This cocoon is the source of silk that is responsible for the many silk materials found in the world today.

Jungle Nymph

Scientific Name:
Heteropteryx dilatata

Geographical Range:
Malaysia

Diet:
Guava, rose, raspberries, blackberries, and Ficus plants.

Size:
The males can grow up to 10 cm and females up to 15 cm.

Interesting Fact:
Did you know…Jungle Nymphs are one of the heaviest insects in the world!

Vietnamese Stick Insect

Scientific Name:
Baculum extradentatum

Geographical Range:
Tropical forests in Vietnam

Diet:
Bramble, Hawthorne, oak, rose and some Ficus plants.

Size:
The males can grow up to 7.5 cm and females up to 11 cm.

Interesting Fact:
Stick insects have both claws and sucker pads on their feet, which allow them to walk up a vertical surface. This Vietnamese stick insect is distinguishable by its two small horns on its head.

Lubber Grasshopper

Scientific Name:
Romalea microptera

Geographical Range:
Florida.

Diet:
Vegetation, pollen and some fruit.

Size:
Their bodies can grow to an average of about 8 cm long.

How does the Lubber Grasshopper protect itself?
The bright color pattern is a warning to predators that this grasshopper is toxic.

Giant Prickly Stick Insect

Scientific Name:
Extatosoma tiaratum

Geographical Range:
Queensland, Australia and New Guinea.

Diet:
Eucalyptus, bramble, hawthorn, oak and rose.

Size:
Their bodies can grow to about 20 cm long.

Are these insects really spiny?
Yes, they are covered with thorn-like spikes all over their body, and use them for both defense and camouflage.

Spiny Stick Insect

Scientific Name:
Eurycantha calacarata

Geographical Range:
Southeast Asia, hiding among the leaves and bark on the forest floor during the day.

Diet:
Bramble, ivy, oak, rose and some Ficus plants.

Size:
The males can grow up to 10 cm and females up to 15 cm.

Are these insects really spiny?
Yes, they have small spines all over their body, but the males have really large “thorns” under their hind legs that they use to defend themselves against predators.

Madagascar Hissing Cockroach

Scientific Name:
Gromphadorhina portentosa

Geographical Range:
Madagascar

Diet:
Scavengers, consuming just about anything that falls to the ground including fruits and vegetables.

Size:
Adults can reach up to 10 cm long.

Is it true that these Giant Cockroaches ‘hiss’?
Yes, this noise is a ‘defense mechanism’ used to scare off unwanted predators. There are small openings (spiracles) on each side of the roaches’ body which is used for breathing. As the air is forced out of these openings it produces this distinctive hissing noise.

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